Divorce is more than the end of a relationship—it is a legal division of one household into two. For marriages that have lasted for years, the division of property, custody, and less-obvious assets may prove deeply complicated. For spouses who are trapped in abusive relationships, seeking safety for themselves and any children would be the foremost issue, a subject that is addressed in our resources.

At The Harris Law Firm, we know that divorce brings up a great deal of questions. That’s why we have provided articles on the subject of divorce, to help guide spouses seeking divorce to the direction they need to go. Whether your questions is about staying safe while divorcing an abusive spouse, or it is about the division of property in Colorado, these resources offer the answers to many of your basic questions.

If you have a question that remains unanswered by these resources, feel free to call The Harris Law Firm at (303) 622-5502 to have it answered by one of our legal professionals at no cost to you.

Getting a divorce is a very taxing experience emotionally. Sadly, some cases require one of the parties to take additional precautions in order to protect themselves or their children. In some situations, it can be difficult and painful to protect yourself during divorce. One option, of course, is ...
In January of 2000, the Colorado Supreme Court implemented what is known as the “Simplified Dissolution Project” in three Colorado counties. The project was the result of a growing dissatisfaction with the adversary process in domestic relations cases and a concern that the court system was not only ...
When deciding who gets what in a divorce, all property must first be classified as “marital” or “separate” before the court can divide it. Marital property is owned by both parties and is subject to division; while separate property is typically only owned by one spouse and is not subject to ...
The Harris Law Firm offers unbundled legal services through our Self-Represented Resource Center™ Unbundled legal services are a cost effective way to obtain legal services and support from a Colorado family law attorney without being represented by a lawyer. Unbundled services will allow you to ...
Pet custody in divorce can be very contentious. Many pet owners are as close to their pet as a parent to their child. Further, pet owners often refer to themselves as the mother or father of their pet who they adopted, not purchased. However under Colorado law, pets are still characterized as an ...
In the 1970’s, most states in the nation adopted a “no fault” divorce policy. Governments reasoned that the policy would temper the nastiness, finger-pointing and emotional havoc associated with full-blown divorce trials. Additionally, it was thought to be better to give individuals more freedom to ...
Besides mediation and arbitration, there are many other processes and different types of divorce that parties can use to resolve their cases without going to court. One is to combine mediation and arbitration, a process sometimes referred to as med/arb. In med/arb, a third party neutral may start ...
Effective March 18, 2003, the Colorado State Legislature raised the fees for filing many court actions, including domestic relations cases, by fifty percent, in order to accommodate the rising cost of divorce support resources. Colorado Supreme Court Chief Justice Mary Mullarkey explained, “Falling ...
Pro se is a Latin term meaning “on one’s own behalf,” and in the legal arena, a pro se party in a divorce is representing him or herself instead of being represented by a lawyer. If you are contemplating divorce or have been asked for a divorce, you have to decide if you will hire an experienced ...
Existing mid way between litigation and mediation, collaborative law is a form of alternative dispute resolution for couples going through a divorce that can help in avoiding parental alienation. Although separate counsel represents each spouse, and the attorneys act as advocates for their clients, ...